Campbell Dosch

associate member

Campbell began sculpting at Utah Valley University when he took an introductory course in his early 20's. At the time there were only two sculpting courses in the art department. He quickly fell in love with it. Once completing both courses he spent many hours in the classroom studio practicing what he had learned from his instructor after hours. After taking a 15 year break Campbell's wife Jeseca urged him to get back into sculpting and do it professionally. Campbell's artistic inspiration and subject matter focus on Native Americans and the American West. His interest in Native Americans lies in their culture and spirituality. "Their close tie to nature and respect for what God has created is inspiring. In every one of my pieces there is an untold story that I try to tell through physical interpretation. I want viewers to feel the emotion my sculpture is portraying, stepping inside of it for a brief moment and feeling what if feels" Campbell has studied the Native American culture and history . He uses historic references to insure he is accurate in his depictions. Campbell has also learned the art of patina and has incorporated that into his artwork. He learned how to apply the chemical patina (color) to his bronze sculptures so he could capture the exact essence he wanted to portray. "Patina is very tricky, it can make or break the sculpture. Make it too dark or to light, apply it with too much heat or not enough can give it wrong tone and color and ruin the look. Because sculptures are three denominational, shadows are what create the "lines" used to construct the image. Its imperative those shadows are represented correctly or the sculpture looks off"

associate member

Campbell Dosch

Campbell began sculpting at Utah Valley University when he took an introductory course in his early 20's. At the time there were only two sculpting courses in the art department. He quickly fell in love with it. Once completing both courses he spent many hours in the classroom studio practicing what he had learned from his instructor after hours. After taking a 15 year break Campbell's wife Jeseca urged him to get back into sculpting and do it professionally. Campbell's artistic inspiration and subject matter focus on Native Americans and the American West. His interest in Native Americans lies in their culture and spirituality. "Their close tie to nature and respect for what God has created is inspiring. In every one of my pieces there is an untold story that I try to tell through physical interpretation. I want viewers to feel the emotion my sculpture is portraying, stepping inside of it for a brief moment and feeling what if feels" Campbell has studied the Native American culture and history . He uses historic references to insure he is accurate in his depictions. Campbell has also learned the art of patina and has incorporated that into his artwork. He learned how to apply the chemical patina (color) to his bronze sculptures so he could capture the exact essence he wanted to portray. "Patina is very tricky, it can make or break the sculpture. Make it too dark or to light, apply it with too much heat or not enough can give it wrong tone and color and ruin the look. Because sculptures are three denominational, shadows are what create the "lines" used to construct the image. Its imperative those shadows are represented correctly or the sculpture looks off"