Dora Natella

fellow member

My ideas for sculptures come both from historical and contemporary figurative traditions. I call it: the human landscape. It is a landscape I will never get tired of because it's so rich in metaphor and varied in form. It changes so dramatically from person to person. Typically, I begin modeling from direct observation of a live model. This approach gives me a lot of information readily at hand. In the end I have to consciously abandon the model and go for what feels right. What feels right is not literally what is right. Often I change or enhance certain features to convey the feeling of the sculpture rather than make it look precisely like a particular model. Thus the model becomes a place of departure a pretext from which I develop a number of sculptural ideas, like the fragments. A fragment of the figure becomes an entity independent from anything else. I believe in the object as a whole.

fellow member

Dora Natella

My ideas for sculptures come both from historical and contemporary figurative traditions. I call it: the human landscape. It is a landscape I will never get tired of because it's so rich in metaphor and varied in form. It changes so dramatically from person to person. Typically, I begin modeling from direct observation of a live model. This approach gives me a lot of information readily at hand. In the end I have to consciously abandon the model and go for what feels right. What feels right is not literally what is right. Often I change or enhance certain features to convey the feeling of the sculpture rather than make it look precisely like a particular model. Thus the model becomes a place of departure a pretext from which I develop a number of sculptural ideas, like the fragments. A fragment of the figure becomes an entity independent from anything else. I believe in the object as a whole.