John L. Guest

associate member

I discovered my passion for art in 1965 while taking a sculpting class at Texas Tech University. The timing for this discovery was not optimal, since I was developing my thesis in architecture. But something inexplicable took hold of me in that sculpting class, and after completing my thesis I found myself building a small bronze foundry in my father’s back yard. I was captivated by sculpting; by the empowerment of being able to imagine something, and create it in three dimensions. During those first two years I created, cast and exhibited 10 sculptures in a Dallas gallery, who to my delight, sold 6 in as many months. But my enthusiasm was short lived when I began to realize that the financial rewards reaped were mere pennies per hour for the effort expended. And, since I had a family to support, and as an Architect a profession, the passion to sculpt cooled. I wandered into an art gallery in Beaver Creek Colorado in 2009 and met Walt Horton, the sculptor. Talking with him made me realize how much I had missed sculpting; but taking his (and several other) workshops have reignited my passion. For the most part, I have chosen to focus my sculpting on American Wildlife. An experienced hunter can tell in a few seconds the age of a White Tail Buck by observing the way he walks, the mass of his body, and the shape of his head. And that example best illustrates my desire when I sit down to sculpt in that I try to capture the subtle differences in body language, character and the expression of movement in my subjects.

associate member

John L. Guest

I discovered my passion for art in 1965 while taking a sculpting class at Texas Tech University. The timing for this discovery was not optimal, since I was developing my thesis in architecture. But something inexplicable took hold of me in that sculpting class, and after completing my thesis I found myself building a small bronze foundry in my father’s back yard. I was captivated by sculpting; by the empowerment of being able to imagine something, and create it in three dimensions. During those first two years I created, cast and exhibited 10 sculptures in a Dallas gallery, who to my delight, sold 6 in as many months. But my enthusiasm was short lived when I began to realize that the financial rewards reaped were mere pennies per hour for the effort expended. And, since I had a family to support, and as an Architect a profession, the passion to sculpt cooled. I wandered into an art gallery in Beaver Creek Colorado in 2009 and met Walt Horton, the sculptor. Talking with him made me realize how much I had missed sculpting; but taking his (and several other) workshops have reignited my passion. For the most part, I have chosen to focus my sculpting on American Wildlife. An experienced hunter can tell in a few seconds the age of a White Tail Buck by observing the way he walks, the mass of his body, and the shape of his head. And that example best illustrates my desire when I sit down to sculpt in that I try to capture the subtle differences in body language, character and the expression of movement in my subjects.