Lee Hutt

fellow member

Lee Hutt studied painting in Belgium as an undergraduate. There, her love of the classical traditions in art was encouraged. Pursuing a course in psychology, Lee received a masters degree in science from Columbia University. Lee continued to take art classes at the New School where she was influenced by the work of Jacob Lawrence and Chaim Gross. When Lee married and moved to Massachusetts, she intensified her studies in sculpture at Mount Holyoke College and Lyme Academy. Combining her skill as an artist with her understanding of the psychology of people, Lee made a natural transition to portraiture and to the figure. "I work in traditional materials, clay and plaster. The work requires a combination of intensity, conviction, uncertainty and magic.” Each person has a story. I see a face or a figure and read that story. Can I capture that essence in clay? Do you read it and think of your own story? Will these sculptures communicate to the future something about who we are today? I believe so and I feel compelled to persist. In this, I feel myself connected to tradition but struggling with a modern dilemma…the age of ‘me’. Where is the sitter’s dignity…earned or wished for?”

fellow member

Lee Hutt

Lee Hutt studied painting in Belgium as an undergraduate. There, her love of the classical traditions in art was encouraged. Pursuing a course in psychology, Lee received a masters degree in science from Columbia University. Lee continued to take art classes at the New School where she was influenced by the work of Jacob Lawrence and Chaim Gross. When Lee married and moved to Massachusetts, she intensified her studies in sculpture at Mount Holyoke College and Lyme Academy. Combining her skill as an artist with her understanding of the psychology of people, Lee made a natural transition to portraiture and to the figure. "I work in traditional materials, clay and plaster. The work requires a combination of intensity, conviction, uncertainty and magic.” Each person has a story. I see a face or a figure and read that story. Can I capture that essence in clay? Do you read it and think of your own story? Will these sculptures communicate to the future something about who we are today? I believe so and I feel compelled to persist. In this, I feel myself connected to tradition but struggling with a modern dilemma…the age of ‘me’. Where is the sitter’s dignity…earned or wished for?”